Russia.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Commerce. – in the House of Commons on 14th July 1931.

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Photo of Mr Charles Williams Mr Charles Williams , Torquay

14.

asked the President of the Board of Trade the figure of the total excess of imports over exports of merchandise consigned between this country and the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics between 1st October, 1929, and 31st March, 1931?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

The figure is £36,771,202, as may be derived from the particulars given to the hon. Member in answer to his question of 7th July.

Photo of Mr Charles Williams Mr Charles Williams , Torquay

Why was the right hon. Gentleman so reluctant to give these figures the other day and to hide the tremendous adverse balance?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

I was not reluctant. I was giving my hon. Friend the credit of being able to do a simple sum in addition.

Photo of Mr Charles Williams Mr Charles Williams , Torquay

Why did the right hon. Gentleman deny this figure to the public and the Press at that time?

Photo of Mr Charles Williams Mr Charles Williams , Torquay

15.

asked the President of the Board of Trade if he has in- formation and will give figures showing how the balance of trade has varied between the United States of America and the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics since 1st October, 1929?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

I will circulate in the OFFICIAL REPORT a statement showing, quarter by quarter, the value of merchandise imported into and exported from the United States in trade with the Soviet Union from the 1st October, 1929, to the 31st March, 1931, inclusive.

Photo of Mr Charles Williams Mr Charles Williams , Torquay

As the right hon. Gentleman has not given the total

The following table shows the total declared value of merchandise imported into and exported from the United States in trade with the Soviet Union in each of the undermentioned quarters, conversions from the original currency (dollars) into sterling having been made at the approximate par rate of exchange.
Period.Total Imports.Total Exports.Excess of Exports over Imports.
1929.£££
October—December1,184,0005,950,0004,766,000
1930.
January—March972,0009,232,0008,260,000
April—June1,425,0006,262,0004,837,000
July—September1,425,0003,975,0002,550,000
October—December1,188,0004,036,0002,848,000
1931.
January—March539,0009,049,0008,510,000
These figures are derived from the American Official Trade Statistics.
The excess of exports over imports represents the visible balance of trade. Information is not available in the Board of Trade to enable an estimate to be formed of the amount of the invisible items in the balance of trade.