Gloves (Imports).

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Commerce. – in the House of Commons on 10th March 1931.

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Photo of Mr William Greene Mr William Greene , Worcester

25.

asked the President of the Board of Trade from which countries gloves were imported in January, 1930, and January, 1931; and what number of pairs of gloves were imported from each of these countries during the two periods in question?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

As the answer involves a number of figures I will, with the hon. Member's permission, circulate it in the OFFICIAL REPORT.

Photo of Mr William Greene Mr William Greene , Worcester

Is the right hon. Gentleman aware that the figures will show that these imports of foreign articles—[Interruption.]

Photo of Lieut-General Edward Fitzroy Lieut-General Edward Fitzroy , Daventry

It is rather unusual for an hon. Member to ask a question and then proceed to give the information himself.

Sir B. EYRES MONSELL:

May we ask for the reply to be given now?

Photo of Mr James Marley Mr James Marley , St Pancras North

May I ask whether it is in order for an hon. Member to put down a question involving a great deal of expense if he already knows the answer and the figures

Sir B. EYRES MONSELL:

On a point of Order. May I draw your attention to the fact that we have 10 minutes before we reach the end of Question Time.

Photo of Lieut-General Edward Fitzroy Lieut-General Edward Fitzroy , Daventry

If the hon. Member wants the answer, he can have it.

Photo of Mr William Greene Mr William Greene , Worcester

I ask for the answer to be given now.

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

It is rather a long answer with some tables of figures, but as a compromise I will read the essential figures. We imported during January, 1930, 39,000 dozen pairs of gloves of leather and fur, and in January, 1931, 143,000 dozen pairs. Then follows a list of the countries from which they were consigned, the leading countries being Germany, 19,000; France, 24,000; and Italy, 84,000. Of fabric gloves of cotton or of cotton mixed with other materials, the total imports in January, 1930, were 100,000 dozen pairs, and in January, 1931, 273,000 dozen pairs, the most important consignment coming from Germany, 200,000 dozen pairs. In January, 1931, we imported 22,000 fabric gloves of other textile materials, and of gloves of other descriptions of wool, or of which the chief value is wool, 1,400 dozen pairs in January, 1930, and 465 dozen pairs in January, 1931. These figures are not strictly comparable, as during January, 1930, they include, in the case of dutiable goods, imports by parcel post and exclude goods transhipped under bond, whereas the figures for January, 1931, except in the case of goods containing silk or artificial silk, exclude imports by parcel post but include goods in transit.

Photo of Mr William Greene Mr William Greene , Worcester

Is the right hon. Gentleman aware that this enormous increase in the imports of these foreign articles is due to the lapsing of Safeguarding, which is throwing our workers out of employment and giving employment to the foreigner.

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

No, I do not take that view. The imports have certainly increased, but I have not the least doubt that they were artificially increased during January, held up no doubt in view of the forthcoming disappearance of the Duty. A much better way is to take the average imports for months in other comparable years, and in point of fact these figures are actually lower.

Photo of Mr Herbert Samuel Mr Herbert Samuel , Darwen

Would the right hon. Gentleman say whether the imports for the months preceding the repeal of the duty showed any decline, indicating that the imports were held back until, as one would expect, they would be able to come in free of duty?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

I should require notice of that question, but plainly the imports were artificially increased during January.

Mr. ERNEST WINTERTON:

Can the right hon. Gentleman say whether a great portion of these gloves have been made on British machinery supplied from this country?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

Of that question also I should require notice. My hon. Friend

Following are the figures:

THE FOLLOWING TABLE shows the total quantity of the undermentioned descriptions of Gloves imported into the United Kingdom, and registered during the months of January, 1930 and 1931, distinguishing the principal countries whence consigned.

Description and Countries whence consigned.January, 1930.January, 1931.
Gloves of leather and fur:Dozen pairs.Dozen pairs.
Total Imports39,069143,917
of which consigned from:
Germany3,57519,079
Belgium2,4836,620
France3,41724,219
Luxemburg4982,517
Italy25,65384,175
Czechoslovakia6773,904
United States2,2141,591
Fabric gloves of cotton or of cotton mixed with other materials:
Total Imports100,927273,247
of which consigned from:
Germany98,124260,558
Czechoslovakia2603,412
United States8883,861
Japan3,800
Fabric gloves of other textile materials:
Total Imports7,59422,876
of which consigned from:
Germany7,59422,443
Gloves of other descriptions: of wool or of which the chief value is wool:
Total Imports1,400465
of which consigned from:
Germany444240
Irish Free State621225
Of other textile materials:
Total Imports7,70111,041
of which consigned from:
Germany7,5929,783