Russia.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Commerce. – in the House of Commons on 20th January 1931.

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Photo of Mr Irving Albery Mr Irving Albery , Gravesend

6.

asked the President of the Board of Trade how many tons of Russian wheat have been imported into this country during the months of November and December, 1930?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

The total quantity of wheat imported into Great Britain and Northern Ireland registered during November and December, 1930, as consigned from the Soviet Union (Russia), was 5,500,000 cwts. and 6,587,000 cwts, respectively.

Photo of Mr Irving Albery Mr Irving Albery , Gravesend

In view of the constant increase of these imports, are we getting any corresponding benefits in exports to Russia?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

The exports to Russia have, of course, increased during the past year very largely, in my view owing to the inclusion of Russia under the Export Credits Scheme.

Commander OLIVER LOCKERLAMPSON:

Are not Russian nationals being starved of wheat in order to permit of this export?

Sir F. HALL:

Is it a fact that Russian wheat is selling on the London Corn Exchange at 18s. 6d. per quarter c.i.f., and does the right hon. Gentleman think it possible for the British farmer to produce wheat at a profit at that price?

Photo of Sir William Davison Sir William Davison , Kensington South

8.

asked the President of the Board of Trade what is the present amount of the trade balance in favour of the Russian Soviet Government in this country?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

The figures for the first nine months of 1930 corresponding to those which I gave the hon. Member in reply to a similar question on the 1st April last, are as follow:

£
Imports from the Soviet Union (Russia)19,640,574
Exports (including re-exports) to the Soviet Union6,977,906
Similar particulars respecting the last quarter of 1930 will be published next month in the issue for January, 1931, of the "Accounts relating to Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom."

Photo of Sir William Davison Sir William Davison , Kensington South

Will the right hon. Gentleman say why a country with such a very large trade balance in this country requires the benefit of a loan under the Export Credits guarantee in order to buy British goods?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

The reply is surely that in the process of international trade the point cannot be stated in that way. It is quite impossible to link up two countries. These balances enter into many other international transactions. The short reply is that during the past year the exports to Russia had substantially increased.

Photo of Mr Arthur Samuel Mr Arthur Samuel , Farnham

Is not the balance of trade credit belonging to Russia used by Russia to buy foreign goods, and not British goods?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

It may be used as the basis for certain purchases elsewhere, but that is not necessarily to the disadvantage of this country.

Photo of Mr Arthur Samuel Mr Arthur Samuel , Farnham

If that be so, why do we not ask the Soviet Government to use its own credit rather than borrow on our guarantee?

Photo of Mr Carlyon Bellairs Mr Carlyon Bellairs , Maidstone

Why are re-exports included in the estimated balance of trade?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

I should require notice of that question, but I imagine, off-hand, that it is the normal practice in order to present a complete picture of the exports.

Photo of Sir Nicholas Grattan-Doyle Sir Nicholas Grattan-Doyle , Newcastle upon Tyne North

Is not the balance in favour of the Soviet used for hostile propaganda against this country?

Photo of Sir Herbert Nield Sir Herbert Nield , Ealing

11.

asked the President of the Board of Trade the value of the exports of manufactured goods from the United Kingdom to Soviet Russia during the last completed 12 months; and the values of similar exports from Germany, France, Belgium and the United States of America to Soviet Russia?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

Comparable statistics of the exports of manufactured goods to the Soviet Union (Russia) from the countries mentioned are not available. The value of the imports of manufactured goods into the Soviet Union recorded in the official trade returns of that country as imported during the 12 months ended 30th June, 1930, from the United Kingdom was £3,311,000; from Germany, £15,471,000; from France, £1,268,000; from Belgium, £102,000; and from the United States, £21,454,000.

Photo of Captain Harry Crookshank Captain Harry Crookshank , Gainsborough

Can the right hon. Gentleman explain how it is that the United States have been able to send this enormous volume of goods to Russia without an export credits scheme such as we have here?

Photo of Mr William Graham Mr William Graham , Edinburgh Central

I am afraid that raises a very large question. I could not reply, without notice, regarding the precise credit arrangements. But a very great deal could be said on this question.

Photo of Mr Henry Croft Mr Henry Croft , Bournemouth

Is not the explanation of this volume of trade to be found in the fact that the United States have not recognised the Soviet Government?