Oral Answers to Questions — Manipulative Surgery

– in the House of Commons on 14th May 1925.

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Photo of Sir Basil Peto Sir Basil Peto , Barnstaple

62

asked the Minister of Health whether his attention has been called to the action of the General Medical Council under the powers conferred on them by Section 29 of the Medical Act, 1858, in causing to be struck off the register the name of a doctor on the ground that he was guilty of infamous conduct in administering anæsthetics to a patient of a manipulative surgeon not possessing a degree qualifying him to practice in medicine or surgery; and whether he will consider the need of amending the Medical Act in order to give the same right of appeal against decisions under Section 29 of the Medical Act to the Privy Council which is given in the Act under Sections 23 and 24?

Mr. CHAMBERLAIN:

The answer to the first part of the question is in the affirmative. As regards the second part, no right of appeal by individuals to the Privy Council is given by the Sections of the Medical Act, 1838, mentioned by my hon. Friend.

Photo of Sir Basil Peto Sir Basil Peto , Barnstaple

63.

asked the Minister of Health whether he is aware that the subject of manipulative surgery, with one or two exceptions, is not taught in our medical schools; whether he will take steps to point out the advisability of rectifying this omission to the General Medical Council and other responsible bodies; and whether, in the event of a refusal by those bodies to recognise the value of these therapeutic measures, he will take such action as he may deem necessary to insist upon this subject being given adequate prominence in the medical curriculum?

Mr. CHAMBERLAIN:

The revised medical curriculum adopted by the General Medical Council in 1922, which came into operation on 1st January, 1923, includes practical instruction in surgical methods (such as massage and manipulative surgery), orthopæcs and electro- and mechano-therapeutics. The second and third parts of the question do not, therefore, appear to arise.

Photo of Sir Basil Peto Sir Basil Peto , Barnstaple

Have not those who are skilled in manipulative survery to be qualified surgeons under the Medical Act before they are allowed to give the instruction to which my right hon. Friend refers?

Mr. CHAMBERLAIN:

Perhaps my hon. Friend will give me notice.

Photo of Dr Thomas Watts Dr Thomas Watts , Manchester, Withington

Is the right hon. Gentleman aware that manipulative surgery is pure humbug.