Royal Parks (Regulations).

Oral Answers to Questions — Transport. – in the House of Commons on 28th November 1922.

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Photo of Sir William Davison Sir William Davison , Kensington South

35.

asked the Home Secretary whether there are certain by- laws in force in Hyde Park and other Royal parks for the regulation of the conduct of persons using the same which are different from the requirements of the ordinary law and are largely unknown to the public; and whether steps will be taken to revise the said by-laws, so that they may be brought into consonance with the ordinary law with which the public are familiar?

Photo of Mr William Bridgeman Mr William Bridgeman , Oswestry

The Regulations under the Parks Regulation Act, 1872, in so far as they deal with matters of importance relating to the behaviour of users of the parks, differ but little in effect from the provisions of the ordinary law. The Regulations are prominently displayed at every entrance to the parks, and I have no reason to think that the requirements they impose are less well known to the public than are the similar requirements of the ordinary law.

Photo of Sir William Davison Sir William Davison , Kensington South

Does the right hon. Gentleman suggest to the House that there is any provision in the ordinary law of the land that a person is forbidden to speak to another person in a public place without a formal introduction?

Photo of Mr William Bridgeman Mr William Bridgeman , Oswestry

I do not suggest to the House anything more than is contained in my answer.

Photo of Sir William Davison Sir William Davison , Kensington South

Has the right hon. Gentleman studied recent decisions and the opinion of the Chairman of Quarter Sessions on a recent ease, and does he not think it desirable that the by-laws should be revised and the police receive fresh instructions?

Photo of Mr William Bridgeman Mr William Bridgeman , Oswestry

That is the question on the Paper.

Photo of Mr George Lansbury Mr George Lansbury , Poplar Bow and Bromley

In considering this matter, will the right hon. Gentleman consider making the law equal as between menand women?

Viscountess ASTOR:

Does the Home Secretary realise that thousands of women are arrested on the evidence of the police without a word being said, but that when one man is arrested the whole nation is roused?

Photo of Mr William Bridgeman Mr William Bridgeman , Oswestry

I am quite aware that a great many difficulties beset this question, and I do not think that this is a very convenient time to debate it. I am considering the matter.