British Shipping (United States).

Oral Answers to Questions — Russia. – in the House of Commons on 31st July 1922.

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Photo of Viscount  Curzon Viscount Curzon , Battersea South

40.

asked the Prime Minister whether he has any information to the effect that the United States Government have expressed a desire to stop and search British shipping on the high seas outside territorial waters; and whether he can make any statement on the subject?

Photo of Mr David Lloyd George Mr David Lloyd George , Caernarvon District of Boroughs

The United States Government have made certain tentative suggestions with a view to prevent the smuggling of liquor into the United States, and among them is a proposal that the United States Government and His Majesty's Government might enter into a reciprocal arrangement whereby the authorities of each Government would be empowered to search the vessels of the other outside territorial waters up to a distance of 12 miles from the shore. The proposals made by the United States Government are at present under consideration.

Photo of Mr James Gilbert Mr James Gilbert , Southwark Central

76.

asked the Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether, in view of the fact that the British navigation laws were repealed owing to an assurance given by the United States Government in the year 1849 that British ships engaged in foreign trade should be treated in United States ports on the same footing as United States vessels, he will state whether the bargain then made has hitherto been kept?

Photo of Mr Cecil Harmsworth Mr Cecil Harmsworth , Luton

The answer is in the affirmative.

Photo of Mr James Gilbert Mr James Gilbert , Southwark Central

77.

asked the Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether his attention has been called to existing legislation which gives His Majesty's Government powers which could be used as a weapon of defence in the event of the United States of America Shipping Subsidy Sill becoming law; and whether he has any statement to make on the subject?

Photo of Mr Cecil Harmsworth Mr Cecil Harmsworth , Luton

The Customs Consolidation Act of 1853, Section 325, empowers His Majesty's Government to impose such duties on foreign tonnage or goods as may be necessary to countervail the disadvantages which British trade or navigation may suffer from preferences granted by foreign Governments to their vessels or to the goods carried in them. I have no further statement to make at present.