Clause 5. — (Combinations of local authorities.)

Orders of the Day — Local Government and Other Officers' Superannuation Bill. – in the House of Commons on 23rd July 1922.

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(1) The following local authorities, namely:

  1. (a) The council of any county and any local authority whose area is situate within the county; and
  2. (b) Any two or more local authorities whose areas are situate in the same county
may enter into combination for the purposes of this Act:

Provided that such combination shall not take effect unless a combination scheme has been submitted to and approved by the Minister of Health.

(3) Any local authority to which this Act applies may, on such terms and conditions as they think fit and with the approval of the Minister of Health, admit any officers or servants of (a) any local authority, not being a local authority to which this Act applies, whose area is situate within the area of such first - mentioned local authority; or

Photo of Sir Alfred Mond Sir Alfred Mond , Swansea West

I beg to move, in Subsection (1, a), after the word "is", to insert the words "wholly or partly".

This Clause restricts the right of combination to local authorities whose areas are situate within the same county, the reason of the restriction being that the county rate affords a common nexus for such authorities, and gives them a common financial interest in the scheme. It has, however, been pointed out that the area of some authorities, such as river boards and water boards, is not necessarily coterminous with the area of a single county—a rivers board may have jurisdiction extending beyond one county, and the Amendment is therefore designed to allow a county council in such a case to combine with a rivers board, although the area of the rivers board is not wholly within the area of that county.

Photo of Mr Frederick Banbury Mr Frederick Banbury , City of London

The Bill says that every servant who has completed ten years' service shall become incapable of discharging the duties of his office or employment with efficiency by reason of permanent ill-health or infirmity of mind, shall be entitled to a pension.

Now the right hon. Gentleman proposes to insert the words "wholly or partly." What does "wholly or partly" mean? If he is incapable of carrying out his work, I have no objection.

Photo of Mr John Whitley Mr John Whitley , Halifax

The right hon. Baronet has not read the Amendment. This is a question of area.

Amendment agreed to. Further Amendment made:

In Sub-section (1, b), after the word "situate," insert the words "wholly or partly."—[Sir A. Mond.]

Photo of Mr Adam Rodger Mr Adam Rodger , Rutherglen

I beg to move, at the end of Sub-section (1, b), to insert a new paragraph— (c) Any two or more local authorities whose areas are situated in adjoining counties where it appears to the Minister of Health that one of such counties is by reason of its limited population or otherwise insufficient of itself to provide the number of officers or servants required to be designated when adopting the Act. In Scotland we have some very small counties, some of them with populations of under 10,000, and under the Bill such counties would be excluded.

Photo of Mr Charles Murray Mr Charles Murray , Edinburgh South

As far as Scotland is concerned, I shall be glad to accept the principle of this Amendment. I do not think that the Amendment as it stands is in proper form, but if my hon. Friend withdraws it, I will undertake that in another place a more appropriate Amendment shall be introduced on behalf of Scotland.

Photo of Mr Adam Rodger Mr Adam Rodger , Rutherglen

On that assurance, I will withdraw the Amendment.

Amendment, by leave, withdrawn.

Further Amendment made: In Subsection (3, a), after the word "situate," insert the words "wholly or partly."—[Sir A. Mond.]