Oral Answers to Questions — Metropolitan Police.

– in the House of Commons on 30th March 1922.

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Photo of Mr James Remnant Mr James Remnant , Holborn

57.

asked the Home Secretary whether ex-Police Constable Lowes, who was demobilised from the Army in January, 1919, and was refused reinstatement in the Metropolitan Police on medical grounds, has been reexamined by the police surgeon since 7th June, 1920; and, if so, has the result of the examination been communicated to ex-Police Constable Lowes, who had applied for reinstatement in the force?

Photo of Mr Edward Shortt Mr Edward Shortt , Newcastle upon Tyne West

Lowes has not been reexamined since the date mentioned.

Photo of Mr James Remnant Mr James Remnant , Holborn

Did not the right hon. Gentleman make a specific promise in this House that he would see that this man was re-examined?

Photo of Mr Edward Shortt Mr Edward Shortt , Newcastle upon Tyne West

I have no recollection of it.

Photo of Mr Edward Shortt Mr Edward Shortt , Newcastle upon Tyne West

If my hon. Friend will remind me of it, I will look into the matter.

Photo of Mr James Remnant Mr James Remnant , Holborn

If the right hon. Gentleman finds, which is more than probable, that the man's private doctor disagrees with the police surgeon's finding, will the man have the right to appeal to the Medical Tribunal set up last year?

Photo of Mr Edward Shortt Mr Edward Shortt , Newcastle upon Tyne West

This case has been very carefully gone into, and I have no doubt whatever that Lowes is quite physically unfit.

Photo of Mr James Gilbert Mr James Gilbert , Southwark Central

60.

asked the Home Secretary what are the conditions applying to the Metropolitan Police Force as regards residential quarters; are all single men in the force compelled to live at station houses and are married men allowed to live where they choose, or must they be within a mileage distance of the station they are attached to; what rent allowances are now given to men; and whether this varies according to the quarter of London the men are detailed for duty?

Photo of Mr Edward Shortt Mr Edward Shortt , Newcastle upon Tyne West

As the answer is rather long, perhaps my hon. Friend will allow me to circulate it in the OFFICIAL REPORT.

Following is the answer:

Married men are provided with quarters, rent free, or are given rent aid allowance in lieu. Single men live in section houses, rent free, except in special circumstances. When accommodation is available in section houses, single men are required to reside there unless there are special circumstances which render a departure from that rule desirable or permissible; for instance, exception may be made in the case of men supporting widowed mothers or other relatives. Married men are expected to reside within the limits of their station areas, or, failing proper accommodation there, within a reasonable distance beyond, but, owing to the difficulties that at present exist in obtaining any sort of housing accommodation, a number of men, who have recently joined the force and others who have been transferred to other divisions on promotion, etc., are residing at considerable distances from their stations and have to travel backwards and forwards to their homes. The rent aid allowances for married men are the actual amounts paid in rent, rates, and taxes, subject to the following maxima:

  • Superintendents: £80 per annum.
  • Inspectors: 20s. a week.
  • Sergeants: 17s. a week.
  • Constables: 14s. 6d. a week.
These maximum limits do not vary according to the quarter of London in which the men are detailed for duty. These conditions will be altered, in some respects, as from the 1st April, as part of the measures which are being taken for the reduction of police expenditure.