Beer, Spirits and Wine (Consumption).

Oral Answers to Questions — Naval and Military Pensions and Grants. – in the House of Commons at on 22 June 1921.

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Photo of Mr Barnet Kenyon Mr Barnet Kenyon , Chesterfield

105.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer the consumption of beer, spirits, and wine in the United Kingdom during the quarters ending 31st March in the years 1918, 1919, 1920, and 1921?

Photo of Sir Robert Horne Sir Robert Horne , Glasgow Hillhead

The following table shows the net quantities of beer, spirits and wine retained for home consumption in the United Kingdom during the quarters ended 31st March in each of the years 1918, 1919, 1920 and 1921:

and 1s. 3½d., with results detrimental to the trading and financial interests of this country and India, and in view of the fact that the recent attempt to stabilise the rupee at 2s. was a complete failure, he will consider the desirability of consulting representatives of India and the other Dominions with the view of establishing, with the United States and other leading nations, open mints for the coinage of gold and silver at a fixed ratio, thus rendering both or either of these metals equally available for the payment of international and national debts;

(2) If, in consideration of the fact that the relative values of gold and silver varied to a very slight extent only during the nineteenth century while silver and gold were equally available in the United States and the Latin Union for the payment of debts, whereas after the wholesale demonetisation of silver, in and after 1873, the fluctuations in the relative values of these metals has been continual and of extreme degree, he will consider the desirability of consulting representatives from the United States and of the principal European countries with the view of basing money issues on gold and silver by opening the mints of each country to the coinage of both metals at the fixed ratio of 15½ to 1?

Photo of Sir Robert Horne Sir Robert Horne , Glasgow Hillhead

The financial and economic difficulties which have necessarily to be faced as the outcome of the War are many and complex, and I do not think that they are likely to be rendered more easy of solution by the suggestions which the hon. Member is good enough to make in his questions.