Orders of the Day — Finance.

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  • Mr. CHAMBERLAIN'S STATEMENT.
  • Review of National Prospects. (1 speech)

    I beg to move That this House, realising the serious effects upon the trade and industry of the nation of the enormous financial burdens resulting from the War, promises its hearty support to the...

  • Revenue, 1919–20.

    The second observation that I wish to make is this. I hear in some quarters that the situation disclosed in these Papers is worse than the public anticipated. I can only say that if that is so it...

  • Expenditure, 1919–20. (7 speeches)

    With these preliminary observations, I turn to the expenditure of the current year. The Budget deficit has been increased, as shown in the White Paper, by £223,500,000 to a total of...

  • Prevailing Conditions of the Year.

    In considering the expenditure of the year, may I pause for a moment to ask the House to throw -their mind back to the conditions of this year? The usual form which criticism takes is to say that...

  • Control of Expenditure. (2 speeches)

    The House will desire to know, and I think that this is the moment at which I should tell them, what we have done to secure control over finance, and enforce reduction of expenditure. Let me...

  • Staffs of Government Departments.

    What has this finance committee done? Take first the question of Staffs; not because they are the most important, but because they bulk unduly large in the public eye. It must be obvious that in...

  • Subsidies.

    I turn to the question of subsidies. They are the second large item of expenditure of a temporary and extraordinary character. The position in regard to the coal subsidy is necessarily dependent...

  • Army Reductions.

    Next I come to the fighting services. Details in regard to the fighting services will be given, of course, by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for War-and the First Lord of the...

  • Naval Reductions.

    I turn to the Navy, in which, equally, we have had the advice and help of my right hon. Friend the First Lord of the Admiralty., As a result of our discussion five battleships of the Home Fleet...

  • "normal Year."

    I will just say a word about the paper presented in respect to the "Normal Year." Let me begin by saying what the "Normal Year" is, and what the "Normal Year" is not, and if I can convey it in...

  • Forecast of Financial Position, 1920–21. (2 speeches)

    What the House is more interested in than a hypothetical "Normal Year" is next year. I am not going to attempt at this stage to estimate the expenditure or receipts for the next financial year.

  • Floating Debt.

    That leads me to say a few words about the Debt. I hope the House will pardon me if I do that. In my Budget Statement on the 30th April, 1919, I stated that the Floating Debt on the 31st March of...

  • External Debt.

    A more agreeable feature of the Debt figures is the fact that we have made a beginning of reducing our external indebtedness. Our debt to the United States Government will be approximately...

  • No AUTUMN BUDGET.

    In those circumstances, and in view of the general review of the situation which I have made, the House will consider afresh the demand which has been advanced for the immediate presentation of a...

  • General Levy on Capital.

    But the House may desire, and we may all agree, not to content ourselves with the Half per Cent. Sinking Fund, but to make an immediate and exceptional effort to reduce our debt, and particularly...

  • Tax on War Profits.

    But there is another proposal which is quite distinct from the general Capital Levy, though the distinction is not always kept in mind. It is the proposal for a special levy on wealth accumulated...

  • Summary of Conclusions. (35 speeches)

    I have omitted some things that I intended to say, but I have already made. a long speech. Let me summarise my conclusions. At the basis of all Revenue Returns and all Estimates of taxation is...