Proclamation by General Allenby.

Oral Answers to Questions — Egypt. – in the House of Commons on 8th April 1919.

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Photo of Mr Albion Richardson Mr Albion Richardson , Camberwell Peckham

(by Private Notice) asked the Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether he is now in a position to make a further statement with reference to the situation in Egypt?

Mr. HARMSWORTH:

General Allen by, the Special High Commissioner, has, in the exercise of the discretionary powers granted to him, issued a Proclamation to the following effect: Now that order has been in great measure restored, I declare, in agreement with His Highness The Sultan, that there are no restrictions on travel, and that Egyptians who wish to leave the country will be free to do so. It is understood that a Ministry is in course of formation, and that a deputation of Ministers will shortly visit this country in response to the invitation already twice extended to them by His Majesty's Government.

Photo of Colonel Josiah Wedgwood Colonel Josiah Wedgwood , Newcastle-under-Lyme

Will Indians who are able to leave India also be allowed to land in this country?

Mr. HARMSWORTH:

I think that question should be addressed to the Secretary of State for India.

Photo of Colonel Josiah Wedgwood Colonel Josiah Wedgwood , Newcastle-under-Lyme

Are the people who were originally barred from coming to this country now to be allowed to come here?

Mr. HARMSWORTH:

I understand that the terms of General Allenby's Proclamation, will include that.

Photo of Viscount  Turnour Viscount Turnour , Horsham and Worthing

Can the hon. Gentleman tell the House anything about the riots reported to-day, in which several prominent Englishmen were killed in Abdin Square three days ago?

Mr. HARMSWORTH:

I shall be glad if the Noble Lord will put that question down to me to-morrow; I have no official information of it.

Mr. THOMAS:

Would it be possible for the Foreign Office to give the House information with regard to this very disturbing matter, rather than leave it to be forced out by questions and rumours outside?

Mr. HARMSWORTH:

If the right hon. Gentleman can suggest means by which that can be done, we shall be most willing to do it.

Mr. THOMAS:

Are not the means at the disposal of the Government itself if in their judgment there are matters of public importance of this kind? Would it not be better to report them to the House rather than wait for questions?

Photo of Mr John Walters Mr John Walters , Sheffield, Brightside

Cannot you get one of your tame private secretaries to put a prepared question?