Photo of Iris Robinson

Iris Robinson (Strangford, DUP)

To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many children living in the province are estimated to be living in poverty, broken down by (a) Northern Ireland local government district and (b) parliamentary constituency.

Photo of Angela Smith

Angela Smith (Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Northern Ireland Office; Basildon, Labour)

The following tables show the numbers and percentages of children in Northern Ireland living in relative income poverty before housing costs and after housing costs across (a) local government districts (table 1) and (b) parliamentary constituencies (table 2). Due to small sample sizes in individual years, it was necessary to combine data for the years 2002–03 and 2003–04 to enable analysis. The figures presented in the tables are the most up to date currently held by Northern Ireland Government.

Table 1: Number and percentage of children in relative poverty by local government district for 2002–03 and 2003–04 combined
Relative poverty before

housing costs

Relative poverty after

housing costs

Local

government

district

Number Percentage Number Percentage
Ards 1,700 13 1,900 15
Armagh 1,300 9 2,000 14
Ballymena 4,400 23 4,800 25
Banbridge 2,400 17 2,400 17
Belfast 14,700 26 15,200 27
Castlereagh 2,100 14 3,500 23
Coleraine 6,500 37 6,300 36
Craigavon 7,100 24 7,100 24
Derry 9,200 32 9,100 32
Downpatrick 2,500 12 3,900 19
Dungannon 3,100 20 4,900 32
Fermanagh 4,300 23 5,200 28
Lisburn 3,400 15 4,100 18
Newry and Mourne 4,700 25 4,900 26
Newtownabbey 1,900 7 4,700 18
North Down 2,900 14 4,200 21
Cookstown and Magherafelt(57) 5,200 38 6,600 48
Larne and Moyle(57) 3,300 35 3,100 33
Omagh and Strabane(57) 6,600 30 8,400 38
Other(58) 7,400 18 7,800 19
All 95,00 22 110,500 25

(57) Local government districts combined due to sample size requirements.

(58) Remaining local government districts (of Antrim, Ballymoney, Carrickfergus, and Limavady) combined due to small sample sizes.

Source:

Households Below Average Income 2002–03 and 2003–04 Department for Social Development.

Table 2: Number and percentage of children in relative poverty by parliamentary constituency for 2002–03 and 2003–04 combined
Relative poverty before

housing costs

Relative poverty after

housing costs

Parliamentary constituency Number Constituency Number Constituency
Belfast East 3,500 23 4,200 29
Belfast North 5,300 29 5,200 28
Belfast South 2,100 17 2,900 24
Belfast West 5,900 24 6,900 28
East Antrim 2,900 16 3,700 20
East Londonderry 8,000 30 7,600 29
Fermanagh and South Tyrone 7,100 22 9,500 30
Foyle 9,200 32 9,200 32
Lagan Valley 2,900 13 3,300 15
Mid Ulster 5,600 34 7,300 44
Newry and Armagh 4,500 20 5,600 25
North Antrim 8,000 24 8,500 25
North Down 2,800 13 4,200 20
South Antrim 4,800 14 6,500 20
South Down 5,600 17 7,000 22
Strangford 2,400 12 2,600 13
Upper Bann 8,000 21 7,900 21
West Tyrone 6,600 30 8,500 38
All 95,000 22 110,500 25

Source:

Households Below Average Income 2002–03 and 2003–04 Department for Social Development.

Notes to tables:

1. Numbers are rounded to the nearest hundred and percentages to the nearest whole number.

2. As with any sample survey the numbers and percentages quoted in the table above are subject to sampling error.

3. Data was sourced from Households Below Average Income Northern Ireland (HBAI NI). The HBAI NI is based on information collected from the Family Resources Survey (FRS). The FRS was first run in NI in 2002–03.

4. The HBAI is the main source of income poverty measures throughout the UK and is used to monitor the United Kingdom's child poverty targets.

5. Relative income poverty is defined as households who have an income less than 60 per cent. of the contemporary median income.

6. Income before housing costs (BHC) includes the following main components: usual net earnings from employment; profit or loss from self-employment (losses are treated as a negative income); all Social security benefits (including housing benefit, social fund, maternity, funeral and community care grants but excluding social fund loans) and tax credits; income from occupational and private pensions; investment income; maintenance payments, if a person receives them directly; income from educational grants and scholarships (including, for students, top up loans and parental contributions); the cash value of certain forms of income in kind (free school meals, free welfare milk, free school milk and free TV licence for those aged 75 and over).

7. Income is net of the following items: income tax payments; national insurance contributions; domestic rates (this includes water and sewerage charges for Northern Ireland); contributions to occupational pension schemes (including all additional voluntary contributions (AVCs) to occupational pension schemes, and any contributions to personal pensions); all maintenance and child support payments, which are deducted from the income of the person making the payment and parental contributions to students living away from home.

8. Income After Housing Costs (AHC) is derived by deducting a measure of housing costs from BHC income measure. Housing costs include the following: rent (gross of housing benefit); domestic rates; mortgage interest payments (net of tax relief); structural insurance premiums (for owner occupiers); ground rent and service charges.

Annotations

No annotations

Sign in or join to post a public annotation.