More options
Sort by relevance | Sorted by date: newest / oldest | Show use by person

Results 1-20 of 2,839 for tax credits

Did you mean: tax credit?

Scottish Parliament: Living Wage (23 April 2014) See 2 other results from this debate

John Wilson: ...the Procurement Reform (Scotland) Bill is that we have to ensure that the people whom we want to be paid the living wage will genuinely benefit from it. At present, any worker who is in receipt of tax credits—or, as Ken Macintosh outlined, housing benefits—and who receives a rise in their earnings will have their tax credits clawed back in the following financial year....

Public Administration Select Committee: Backbench Business — Easter Adjournment (10 April 2014)

Jim Shannon: ...we in this House also have a case to answer. I have been outspoken, as have others—including, notably, the hon. Member for Harlow (Robert Halfon)—about the rate of UK fuel excise duty, which results in 58p a litre being added in tax. I give credit to the Government, however, because they have taken significant steps to address the cost of fuel through the abolition of the fuel...

Higher Education — Motion to Take Note (9 April 2014) See 2 other results from this debate

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon: ...including the noble Lord, Lord Hennessy, referred to the loan system. We are absolutely not seeking to treat the student loan system like a private debt system. The system operates very much like a graduate contribution scheme, and we feel that it takes the best features of a graduate tax. Students repay only when they can afford and at only 9% of income earned above the 21,000...

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: New Clause 5 — Bank payroll tax (9 April 2014)

Cathy Jamieson: ...occasions in the course of these debates—have fallen by 1,600 since 2010. That is a huge amount of money for those on the lowest incomes. That may not have an impact on those who received the average tax cut of 36,300, but it is certainly has an impact on ordinary people who are trying to do the best for their families. It is worth repeating the figures from the Institute...

Income Distribution and Taxation (9 April 2014) See 3 other results from this debate

Andrew Smith: I congratulate the hon. Gentleman on securing this debate on an important issue. I resisted intervening on the bedroom tax and so on because I wanted to make this point. Does he share my concern, notwithstanding what he said about raising the allowance, that the impact of the tapers on people in receipt of universal credit will be such that, for somebody just above the tax threshold, the rate...

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Clause 11 — Tax relief for married couples and civil partners (9 April 2014) See 5 other results from this debate

Sheila Gilmore: ...; it said it did not previously. We are talking about only a small amount of money, but let us see what it is equivalent to. Many people in this country have been outraged by the Government’s bedroom tax. Even if that makes the savings the Government claim it will, which I doubt, it will save less than the amount this measure will pay out. That is the problem: the Government say that...

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Engagements (9 April 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

William Bain: Is the Prime Minister aware that, for 3 million low-income families, for every 3 they gain through the higher personal tax allowance, they will lose 2 straight away through universal credit? Is he simply giving with one hand but taking away from low-paid Britain with the other?

[Albert Owen in the Chair] — Personal Independence Payments (Wales) (9 April 2014)

Kevin Brennan: ...my constituency a women who suffered a stroke made an application in June 2013, and has just received the benefit. Her husband elected to reduce his hours at work as a result of which they lost the tax credits that they were entitled to, so they went into even deeper problems as a result of the unacceptable delays.

Oral Answers to Questions — Foreign and Commonwealth Office: New Clause 1 — Childcare provision (8 April 2014) See 10 other results from this debate

Nicky Morgan: ...in the importance of flexibility. We do not want to prescribe any further the number of hours that families should have. We want there to be full flexibility, and that is one of the advantages of the tax-free child care provisions this Government are suggesting. Parents and families will be able to build up credits in accounts and will then be able to spend them in the way that suits them best.

Fairness in Pension Provision (8 April 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

Steve Webb: ...as part of a civilised society I do not want people who have no income to be unable to afford medicines. That is just the way it is. If we give everyone free prescriptions and free everything, we will just tax everyone to the hilt. I understand what the hon. Gentleman says, and the new state pension system will start to address that point by setting levels of pension above the basic means...

Oral Answers to Questions — Foreign and Commonwealth Office: New Clause 4 — Report on increasing the additional rate of income tax to 50% (8 April 2014) See 2 other results from this debate

Sheila Gilmore: We have to be honest about the tax threshold. The primary driver behind the change is constantly presented as being concern for the low paid, but the major part of the benefit has accrued to those who are better off. The change also has a substantial cost, at a time when we are told that money is tight. It is worth considering what would help the less well-off in a more concrete way. When the...

Pensions Bill — Commons Reason (8 April 2014)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: ...marriage, as disabled people have lived into retirement, as mothers have joined the labour force, as grandparents in their 50s have become carers of even frailer parents in their 80s, so governments over the years have credited those in unwaged work—mainly women—into the NI system. Noble Lords—many of whom are here today—have helped enormously to make all that...

Oral Answers to Questions — Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Clause 5 — Charge for financial year 2015 (8 April 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

David Gauke: ...targeted than those proposed by the Opposition and benefit all businesses. Amendment 2, tabled by the shadow Chancellor and his colleagues, proposes a review of the impact of the additional cut in corporation tax with particular reference to businesses with fewer than 50 employees. I understand from the comments made by the shadow Chief Secretary in last week’s debate that what is...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Oral Answers to Questions: Film Industry (8 April 2014)

Arlene Foster: Our Government — the UK Government — have taken great steps forward with tax credits. One of the things that we talked about with Walt Disney was the fact that this has become a very good place in which to invest in production. It is one of the reasons why Northern Ireland Screen is looking to increase what it does. As he will recognise, taxation is very...

Justice and Home Affairs Opt-out (7 April 2014)

Yvette Cooper: ...of her officials have to work on the issue, as opposed to the more substantial matters on which we should argue for reforms, such as changing the rules so that we do not have to pay child benefit and child tax credit for children abroad; or changing the rules on free movement for new accession states; or revisiting the posting of workers directive to strengthen protection for workers; or...

Youth Unemployment — Question (7 April 2014)

Lord Freud: The key element of universal credit, clearly, is that it is an incentive for everyone to go to work and to work more. That is particularly attractive to younger people who are excluded from tax credits. Around universal credit, we are putting in place a series of local partnerships so that we can provide holistic help for people who have barriers to going into work. That is the issue. One...

Bill Presented: Civil Service Reform (3 April 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

Jonathan Ashworth: ...is increasingly frustrated and baffled as to why their interaction with the Government has to be conducted through so many different agencies. How many times do they have to hand over their personal data—whether for a driving licence, a passport, a tax return or benefits—to many different Departments? We understand how it works, because we are politicians, but our constituents...

Bill Presented: Backbench Business — Sanctioning of Benefit Recipients (3 April 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

Yvonne Fovargue: ...of a sanction means the temporary suspension of jobseeker’s allowance for a minimum of four weeks. As the hon. Member for Birmingham, Yardley (John Hemming) said, it is different for universal credit, which is “until engagement” plus seven days, which seems a lot fairer. The maximum sanction period is three years. Gillian Guy, chief executive of Citizens Advice, has...

Housing Costs (3 April 2014)

Anne Begg: ...for housing costs in the reformed welfare system. Our inquiry explored recent reforms to housing support, including the effects of the individual household benefit cap, the changes to council tax relief, the effects on supported accommodation and reforms to local housing allowance, which is housing benefit for those who are renting in the private sector. We considered the changes that...

Business of the House (3 April 2014)

Angela Eagle: ...been remarkable for the sheer scale of the incompetence emerging after this Government’s four years in charge. On Monday, we learned that the Government have got only 3,780 people into their flagship universal credit scheme, which was sold as a way of transforming the lives of people on benefits. That is 0.3% of the 1 million people the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions was...

   More options
Sort by relevance | Sorted by date: newest / oldest | Show use by person