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Results 1-20 of 137 for starbucks

Funeral Services: Clause 17 — Retention of relevant data (9 December 2014)

John McDonnell: ...with local authority staff in 2009. Two Derby city council employees watched her when, as Derby Telegraph’s local government correspondent, she met four current and former council employees in a Starbucks coffee shop. The local authority said that RIPA was used to get surveillance authority for officials because they were protecting the council’s interests. The consequences for...

Autumn Statement — Statement (3 December 2014)

Lord Razzall: ...is that there should be a 25% tax on the profits of a multinational company earned in the United Kingdom. Is he able to expand on that? I understand that one of the arguments of companies such as Amazon and Starbucks is that they do not make any profits in the United Kingdom.

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Autumn Statement (3 December 2014)

Margaret Hodge: ..., particularly by challenging the mismatch between the form of a company’s structure and the substance of its activities, which is a key recommendation from the Public Accounts Committee. This week, Starbucks announced that it will pay no corporation tax in the UK for the next three years. Can he tell the House when the measures that he has announced will be implemented and how they...

Opposition Day: [10th alloted day] — The Economy (26 November 2014)

Gordon Birtwistle: ...the problem; we are working on it and are approaching 2 million apprenticeships. I am proud to be the apprenticeship ambassador for the Government. I travel to all sorts of different companies including Starbucks, Next and Rolls Royce—every aspect of business—to talk to young people who believe that they can create prosperity for themselves, the companies they work for and the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Treasury: Tax Avoidance (4 November 2014)

Mark Hunter: ..., a record £24 billion in additional tax revenue was raised in the last financial year. Does my hon. Friend agree that much more remains to be done to make sure that multinationals such as Starbucks and Google pay their fair share?

Business of the House: Backbench Business — UK Drugs Policy (30 October 2014)

Sarah Wollaston: ...view on the taking of drugs, other than my objection to people supporting one of the most evil worldwide businesses or cartels. It always surprises me that people who object to buying coffee in Starbucks and who refuse to support Amazon are quite happy to support cartels that cause untold misery to hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Until such time as we have a change in...

Serious Crime Bill [HL] — Report (2nd Day) (28 October 2014)

Lord Black of Brentwood: ...and access to telephone records. Occasionally, a case of this arose in the public domain. Back in 2010, the Derby Telegraph reported on how the local authority there dispatched two officers to a local Starbucks to spy on a reporter who had been seen talking to current and former council employees. That council used RIPA powers to do that because they give local authorities the right to...

Finance Bill — Second Reading (16 July 2014)

Lord Wakeham: ...far into corporation tax because my noble friend Lord Lawson made a scathing attack on its inadequacies. However, if the Government think that they will get international agreement to deal with the problems of Starbucks and other such companies by negotiating on corporation tax in a wider world, they should forget it; that is not going to be the way. Corporation tax has passed its sell-by...

Tax: Aggressive Tax Avoidance — Question (9 July 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

Lord Razzall: My Lords, at the G8 meeting last year—it is now the G7—the Prime Minister led on the question of tax avoidance by the multinational companies that we all know, such as Starbucks, Amazon and Google. They seem to do significant business in the UK but pay very little tax. What progress has been made in that area?

Outlawries Bill: Debate on the Address — [1st day] (4 June 2014)

Charles Walker: ...8217;s Revenue and Customs crafted in a very aggressive way. These people are working extremely hard. They are conscientious, law abiding and the backbone of the economy. It really sticks in their craw when they see large multinationals such as Starbucks and Amazon appear before Select Committees and readily admit that they pay no or almost no corporation tax in this country. We talk about...

Scottish Parliament: Revenue Scotland and Tax Powers Bill: Stage 1 (20 May 2014)

Willie Rennie: ...starkly with the rhetoric that has been used about aggressive tax avoidance in the UK, as if somehow HMRC is stuck in the past, unable to tackle aggressive tax avoidance by the likes of Amazon and Starbucks and many other companies that we have heard of. However, when John Mason gets down to the detail of exactly how we will implement this new tax body and the principles that will be...

Scottish Parliament: Wealth and Income Inequality (7 May 2014)

John Finnie: We all have a lot in common on this subject. To what extent does the minister believe that cutting corporation tax and giving breaks to firms such as Amazon and Starbucks will help to reduce inequality?

Public Bill Committee: Finance (No. 2) Bill: Clause 8 - Annual exempt amount for 2014-15 (29 April 2014)

Shabana Mahmood: ...for tax avoidance purposes has always been very real and stark and potentially very large in terms of revenue. It is interesting that the scheme was launched at a time of concern about tax avoidance and that still remains the case. Last summer, we had the whole raft of stories about Google, Starbucks and others. Concern about tax avoidance is extremely high. Ministers are continually...

[Mr Andrew Turner in the Chair] — Backbench Business — Incapacity Benefit Migration (3 April 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

Sheila Gilmore: ...a café and bakery, and trains learning-disabled youngsters, but the problem for many of them is that working in mainstream catering would be difficult, and they could not cope with McDonalds or Starbucks.

Public Bill Committee: Deregulation Bill: Clause 61 - Exercise of regulatory functions: economic growth (20 March 2014)

John Cryer: ...;s Revenue and Customs, which has a reputation for doing deals with large companies and letting them off large amounts of tax. But suppose it grew a backbone—I know that is difficult to imagine—and decided to take on Vodafone or Starbucks. In the past, HMRC has done extremely controversial deals with those companies and let them off billions of pounds in tax. Will Vodafone,...

Ways and Means: Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation — Amendment of the Law (19 March 2014)

Gordon Birtwistle: ...fighter jets at BAE Systems in Preston, missile systems in Bolton and Airbus aircraft wings in Chester. I have also seen the other side of manufacturing. Only yesterday, I went to see apprentices at Starbucks in the Westfield shopping centre in White City and they showed me how to make a proper latte with a fancy topping. I met some amazing young people. I have also met apprentices at...

Petitions: Farmers Markets (5 March 2014)

Richard Burden: ...receive all the benefits of operating in the UK, but do not necessarily pay back their fair share. We all know that multinational companies such as Google and Amazon are paying little or no corporation tax in our country, despite running very expensive and extensive operations here. Starbucks has reported taxable profit in the UK just once in 15 years, and Vodafone has recently revealed...

Business of the House: Parliamentary Representation (27 February 2014)

Andrew Percy: ...operate. It sometimes feels very much like a private members club. I remember going into the Tea Room for the first time and being told, “You can’t sit on this side, because that’s where Labour Members sit.” When I go to Starbucks or Mae’s Tearoom in Goole, I sit wherever there is a spare table, so that seemed like a strange thing. With the wooden panels, the...

National Insurance (Renaming): Backbench Business — Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (25 February 2014)

Jim Sheridan: ...live in a world where certain global corporations seem to get away with breaking the rules and going over the heads of national Governments. The tax avoidance of global companies such as Amazon, Starbucks and Google, to name just a few, is unacceptable, but a stronger UK Government could hold them to account. The ISDS sets up a system where multinational corporations can challenge and sue...

Written Answers — Health: Departmental Responsibilities (29 January 2014)

Jane Ellison: ...MUIE Catering Services Limited Mondélez International, Inc Nando's Nestle UK Ltd PepsiCo UK and Ireland Pizza Hut (UK) Limited Ponti's Group Ltd Prezzo PLC Quorn Foods Restaurant Group PLC Sodexo UK and Ireland Starbucks Coffee Company Stateside Foods Ltd Subway International Tesco PLC The Co-operative Group Ltd The Naturally Naughty Cake .Co Tragus Ltd Unilever UK and Ireland United...

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