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Results 1–20 of 146 for starbucks

Health: Diabetes — Question for Short Debate (2 Jul 2015)

Baroness Young of Old Scone: ...We have to press the commissioners and the providers to look at new ways of providing that vital education, using new technology, online opportunities, peer learning groups, lay educators, flexible times and flexible locations. We have provided programmes based in Starbucks and in village halls. We need to find ways that are as attractive as possible to that huge range of people now...

Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill [HL] — Second Reading (Continued) (8 Jun 2015)

Baroness Wheatcroft: ..., but gradually local businesses, whether grocers, department stores, dairies or local newspapers, were taken over, generally by businesses headquartered in London or the south-east. Simultaneously, Starbucks and McDonald’s have plagued our high streets. The end result is that local, professional firms, whether accountants or printers, again lost business to the big firms of...

Bills Presented: Devolution and Growth across Britain (3 Jun 2015)

Anna Turley: ...Swales made a big contribution both to the constituents of Redcar as a diligent and hard-working constituency MP, and in the House, most notably in his role on the Public Accounts Committee, where he led the corporate tax avoidance hearings involving Starbucks, Amazon and Google. I thank the people of every corner of my constituency who put their faith so decisively in me to stand up and...

Business of the House (24, 25 and 26 March): Clause 41 — The Pubs Code (24 Mar 2015)

Andrew Griffiths: ...—profitable and successful—businesses for the people who invest in them. We all recognise that in the modern world, where there is the constant redevelopment and repackaging of the offering in the service industry, be it from Starbucks, Costa Coffee or the local pub, there is a dramatic need for investment. If a pub does not have investment, looks shabby and down-at-heel, does...

Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill: Report (2nd Day) (9 Mar 2015)

Baroness Neville-Rolfe: ...is not a pub, and Clause 71 enables the Government to exempt Harry Ramsden’s from the regime. Similar examples will be considered on a case-by-case basis. We will look at the points made today about Harry Ramsden’s and Starbucks in developing the code. My noble friend Lord Hodgson was concerned about potential unintended consequences and asked for more to be done in the Bill....

Opposition Day — [17th Allotted Day]: Tax Avoidance (11 Feb 2015)

Charlie Elphicke: ...Union and the nature of the parent-subsidiary directive. They should be ashamed of themselves. Nor did they do anything to deal with the problems of international tax avoidance. Companies such as Starbucks, Amazon, Google and Apple—the list goes on—pay hardly any tax in this country because the tax rules were set up in the 19th century and are not fit for purpose. In the past...

Foreign Exchange Transactions (3 Feb 2015)

Austin Mitchell: ...shares are bought and sold, the transaction is time-stamped. In the United States, as a result of an amendment to the Government Securities Act in 1993, a time stamp must be used when Government securities are bought and sold. I do not know what the case is with gilts here, but trades in gilts should certainly be time-stamped. When someone buys a Starbucks coffee, it is time-stamped, yet...

Oral Answers to Questions — Treasury: Corporation Tax (Northern Ireland) Bill (27 Jan 2015)

Jim Shannon: ...company in Northern Ireland. This means that it could put any profits made elsewhere back into the Northern Ireland branch, saving on corporation tax. Concern about that was expressed in the Westminster Hall debate. Big US companies such as Starbucks, Google and Amazon have all been accused of tax dodging entirely or of paying considerably less than they should. What steps will be taken to...

[Mr Andrew Turner in the Chair] — Diverted Profits Tax (7 Jan 2015)

Jim Shannon: ...on those issues from the Minister. The hon. Member for Amber Valley set the scene well in his introduction. Although 10 million might seem like a lot of money, I will put it in perspective. In 2011, Starbucks, a global company that has come into disrepute again for not paying any tax—its coffee is lovely but there is an issue to address elsewhere—made 398 million in...

Funeral Services: Clause 17 — Retention of relevant data (9 Dec 2014)

John Martin McDonnell: ...with local authority staff in 2009. Two Derby city council employees watched her when, as Derby Telegraph’s local government correspondent, she met four current and former council employees in a Starbucks coffee shop. The local authority said that RIPA was used to get surveillance authority for officials because they were protecting the council’s interests. The consequences for...

Autumn Statement — Statement (3 Dec 2014)

Lord Razzall: ...is that there should be a 25% tax on the profits of a multinational company earned in the United Kingdom. Is he able to expand on that? I understand that one of the arguments of companies such as Amazon and Starbucks is that they do not make any profits in the United Kingdom.

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Autumn Statement (3 Dec 2014)

Margaret Hodge: ..., particularly by challenging the mismatch between the form of a company’s structure and the substance of its activities, which is a key recommendation from the Public Accounts Committee. This week, Starbucks announced that it will pay no corporation tax in the UK for the next three years. Can he tell the House when the measures that he has announced will be implemented and how they...

Opposition Day: [10th alloted day] — The Economy (26 Nov 2014)

Gordon Birtwistle: ...the problem; we are working on it and are approaching 2 million apprenticeships. I am proud to be the apprenticeship ambassador for the Government. I travel to all sorts of different companies including Starbucks, Next and Rolls Royce—every aspect of business—to talk to young people who believe that they can create prosperity for themselves, the companies they work for and the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Treasury: Tax Avoidance (4 Nov 2014)

Mark Hunter: ..., a record 24 billion in additional tax revenue was raised in the last financial year. Does my hon. Friend agree that much more remains to be done to make sure that multinationals such as Starbucks and Google pay their fair share?

Business of the House: Backbench Business — UK Drugs Policy (30 Oct 2014)

Sarah Wollaston: ...view on the taking of drugs, other than my objection to people supporting one of the most evil worldwide businesses or cartels. It always surprises me that people who object to buying coffee in Starbucks and who refuse to support Amazon are quite happy to support cartels that cause untold misery to hundreds of thousands of people around the world. Until such time as we have a change in...

Serious Crime Bill [HL] — Report (2nd Day) (28 Oct 2014)

Lord Black of Brentwood: ...and access to telephone records. Occasionally, a case of this arose in the public domain. Back in 2010, the Derby Telegraph reported on how the local authority there dispatched two officers to a local Starbucks to spy on a reporter who had been seen talking to current and former council employees. That council used RIPA powers to do that because they give local authorities the right to...

Finance Bill — Second Reading (16 Jul 2014)

Lord Wakeham: ...far into corporation tax because my noble friend Lord Lawson made a scathing attack on its inadequacies. However, if the Government think that they will get international agreement to deal with the problems of Starbucks and other such companies by negotiating on corporation tax in a wider world, they should forget it; that is not going to be the way. Corporation tax has passed its sell-by...

Tax: Aggressive Tax Avoidance — Question (9 Jul 2014)

Lord Razzall: My Lords, at the G8 meeting last year—it is now the G7—the Prime Minister led on the question of tax avoidance by the multinational companies that we all know, such as Starbucks, Amazon and Google. They seem to do significant business in the UK but pay very little tax. What progress has been made in that area?

Outlawries Bill: Debate on the Address — [1st day] (4 Jun 2014)

Charles Walker: ...8217;s Revenue and Customs crafted in a very aggressive way. These people are working extremely hard. They are conscientious, law abiding and the backbone of the economy. It really sticks in their craw when they see large multinationals such as Starbucks and Amazon appear before Select Committees and readily admit that they pay no or almost no corporation tax in this country. We talk about...

Scottish Parliament: Revenue Scotland and Tax Powers Bill: Stage 1 (20 May 2014)

Willie Rennie: ...starkly with the rhetoric that has been used about aggressive tax avoidance in the UK, as if somehow HMRC is stuck in the past, unable to tackle aggressive tax avoidance by the likes of Amazon and Starbucks and many other companies that we have heard of. However, when John Mason gets down to the detail of exactly how we will implement this new tax body and the principles that will be...


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