More options
Sort by relevance | Sorted by date: newest / oldest | Show use by person

Results 1-20 of 77 for lobbying segment:22282390

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Chloe Smith: ...careful to get such legislation right. The Government are committed to introducing a statutory register of lobbyists. Following the election of May 2010, the Government said in the coalition’s programme for government: “We will regulate lobbying through introducing a statutory register of lobbyists and ensuring greater transparency.” We said in our consultation document:...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Chloe Smith: ...would be an important step towards making politics more transparent. I certainly think it important to open up politics and make it more accessible to everyone. I agree with the hon. Gentleman that lobbying has an important function in politics, namely the putting forward of legitimate views when they are held. That helps in the development of better legislation. However, we need to...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Philip Davies: ...deal with. One is left with the impression that what lies behind all this—to the credit of the hon. Member for Dunfermline and West Fife, he did not put himself in this camp—is some kind of view that lobbying, particularly commercial lobbying, is a bad, grubby thing that should be discouraged. We appear to be trying to find a way to clamp down on commercial lobbying. The...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Chi Onwurah: To clarify, my view is not that a register would mean that everyone would think lobbying is fantastic—I would not want to answer for the consequences for the industry in that regard—but that opinion would be better informed and that living in a democracy we want better informed debate and a better understanding of the access, means and process of power.

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Philip Davies: ...agree with it. I do not see where the lack of transparency is. I have no problem telling anyone who asks me about which organisations I have met. If my constituents want to know who I have met—what lobbying firms and organisations—I would have no problem telling them, and I would like to think that that would be the attitude of most of my colleagues on both sides of the House....

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Philip Davies: ...who would enforce the criminal offences that the Bill creates. There will no doubt be all sorts of vexatious complaints from people who do not like a particular industry, from people who have been lobbying someone about something, and counter-organisations that do not like a particular industry will put in vexatious complaints here and there. People will be contacting their local police...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Thomas Docherty: ...I am drawing a distinction between someone who is remunerated for carrying out the activity of trying to influence, and someone who receives a financial reward if they are successful. The former is lobbying; the latter is not.

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Philip Davies: The hon. Gentleman tries to concoct some distinction through his Bill’s definition, but I do not accept the distinction he is trying to draw. For me, lobbying is what people do to Members of Parliament for whatever particular reason they have. It is perfectly legitimate, and I see no point in drawing a distinction between different types of lobbying—as if commercial lobbying is...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Chi Onwurah: The Labour party in government consulted on a statutory register and, as I said, made it clear that the lobbying industry was drinking in the last chance saloon. It took some time to reach that position. Is the hon. Gentleman saying that there is not enough time in the current slightly open legislative programme for this Government to build on that, or is he saying that he disagrees with the...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

David Nuttall: ...whether we need a register in the first place. It seemed to be accepted from the moment that the debate started nearly three hours ago that it was all about how one defines a lobbyist and lobbying, whereas I want to start with what is the problem. The Bill’s promoter cited one or two specific instances that he was concerned about, but as always I would argue that one or two cases...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

David Nuttall: ...coalition partners on this matter. They have been absent this morning, so we can only guess at their views. I am not clear what the problem is. My postbag is not overflowing with complaints about lobbying, although it is overflowing with opinions about lots of other matters, some of which are being discussed next Tuesday. I have been involved in politics for more than 30 years, and I can...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Philip Davies: I agree with my hon. Friend. On a similar theme, he might like to comment on the civil service. We have all seen in “Yes Minister” how the civil service lobbies the Government in a surreptitious manner to try to protect its interests. Perhaps, on that basis, it might need to be placed on the register.

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

David Nuttall: ...rang up to make an appointment with a Member, they, or their staff, would bother to consult it? It just would not happen, and even if it did, I cannot see what the purpose would be. Members of the lobbying profession are often, by definition, in the business of promoting themselves. Their websites often contain huge lists of their clients; it is not as though they are trying to hide on...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

David Nuttall: That is a useful contribution, but the cost of 200 to 300 is for an entirely different register from that which the Bill proposes, which is statutorily based. The lobbying registration council will be funded by those who will pay to be on the register, so in order to determine the cost of registration we have to look at the LRC itself, which, as I have said, is a blank canvas.

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

David Nuttall: ...a lobbyist in London, Manchester, Liverpool, Nottingham or Glasgow has breached a provision of some code, the details of which we know not. I am extremely concerned about that. The cost of the lobbying registration council will be dependent on its size and nature. There will be no obligation on it to scrimp or save, because no matter what the organisation costs, it will be passed on to...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Philip Davies: We might end up with the ridiculous situation in which the lobbying registration council has to register on its own register because it is lobbying to take further powers and increase the size of its bureaucracy.

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

David Nuttall: ...new areas. We have already come across a possible new area this morning. As has been pointed out, one of the gaps in the Bill is that it does not provide for the registration of those who want to lobby the European Parliament. The council may well lobby the Government to amend the legislation to cover that area. My hon. Friend is right that, on that basis, it would have to be on its own...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

David Nuttall: .... How will a register help? How will it solve any of the so-called problems? I fail to see that there are problems. I am not bothered about them, but perhaps other people are. In a healthy democracy, everybody lobbies their MP. I am sure that every MP has the same experience at the weekend. I will be going down the street and somebody will tap me on the shoulder and say, “I know...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Chi Onwurah: ...Docherty) has given the House an opportunity to debate this important issue—an opportunity that the Government seem strangely reluctant to provide, as we shall see. I am sure all Members agree that lobbying is an essential part of a democratic system. We have all been lobbied, and, as we have heard, we all lobby, on behalf of our constituents and in favour of causes that we care...

Commercial Lobbyists (Registration and Code of Conduct) Bill (1 February 2013)

Chi Onwurah: I do not feel it is appropriate to mention the names that have been presented to me of organisations set up in London to lobby in the United States—I can give that much information. If the hon. Gentleman is particularly interested, I will take advice and will happily write to him later if doing so does not breach the confidence of the person who shared that information with me. We...

   More options
Sort by relevance | Sorted by date: newest / oldest | Show use by person