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[Philip Davies in the Chair] — Business Investment (Outer-City Estates) (18 December 2014)

Graham Allen: ...for Skills and Equalities was in his new office, I had an Adjournment debate on part of the agenda that we are putting forward in Nottingham North. I will not today go back over the demographic and statistical background to prove how deprived my constituency is, other than to say it is one of the most deprived constituencies in the UK. I will give one example: it sends the fewest number of...

Written Answers — House of Lords: Crimes of Violence: Females (17 December 2014)

Lord Bates: ...Oversight Group. The Home Office is working with police forces to put in place measures to enable the collection of consistent and comparable data on domestic abuse from April 2015. Additionally, the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) provides estimates which are comparable over time of the proportion of adults resident in households who experience domestic abuse. The latest...

Written Answers — Home Office: Food: Theft (15 December 2014)

Lynne Featherstone: Holding answer received on 15 December 2014 The Home Office does not hold data centrally on the number of incidents of food theft. Police recorded crime data held by the Home Office records numbers of thefts, but does not separately identify those involving food. Similarly, the Home Office collects statistics on the number of shoplifting incidents recorded by the police at police...

Written Answers — Ministry of Justice: Religious Hatred (15 December 2014)

Michael Penning: Hate crime of any form is unacceptable and taken very seriously by the Government. That’s why there are tough sentencing options available to the courts and we’re working with the police to increase reporting of these terrible offences. This country has some of the toughest laws in the world around hate crime and offenders who commit such crimes should be in no doubt that they...

AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria — Question for Short Debate (11 December 2014)

Lord Lexden: ...that limit access to medicines. One of the most formidable of these barriers is the criminalisation of homosexuality in so many countries. In nearly 80 countries—too many of them members of the Commonwealth—it is a crime to be gay. In circumstances of such grotesque discrimination, gay people with HIV are not going to draw attention to themselves by seeking treatment, assuming...

Written Answers — Ministry of Justice: Drugs: Wales (10 December 2014)

Michael Penning: Drug offending is serious in itself and drug abuse also underlies a huge volume of acquisitive and violent crime which can blight communities. The independent Sentencing Council issued a sentencing guideline on drug offences, effective from February 2012, which brought sentencing guidance together for the first time to help to ensure consistent and proportionate sentencing for all drug...

Anti-Semitism — [Mrs Anne Main in the Chair] (9 December 2014) See 4 other results from this debate

Stephen Williams: ...such attacks should be condemned. During the summer, when the Gaza crisis was at its height, the Community Security Trust, another group with which I have an important relationship, collated some shocking statistics, showing that 543 anti-Semitic incidents were recorded in July and August, although I suspect that that is the tip of the iceberg and not the full picture. I met the CST in...

Modern Slavery Bill: Committee (3rd Day) (8 December 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

Lord McColl of Dulwich: ...for the preservation of the national referral mechanism solely for victims of trafficking. I am sorry, but I disagree. I recognise that international reporting structures and data comparisons mean we need the clarity of specific statistics on victims of trafficking, but we must ensure that there is a clear mechanism for the identification of victims of slavery who have not been trafficked....

Written Answers — Home Office: Detection Rates (5 December 2014)

Lynne Featherstone: There was a significant change from the former detections framework to the new outcomes framework in April 2013. The new outcomes framework includes a broader range of "outcomes" for crimes dealt with by the police. This provides greater transparency on how crimes are resolved when compared with the former detections framework which only covered a subset of the new outcomes and, therefore, of...

Autumn Statement — Statement (3 December 2014)

Lord Deighton: ...for Budget Responsibility. Let me again thank Robert Chote and his team for their hard work, and for restoring integrity and independence to our country’s economic forecasts. Since the Budget, new international statistical standards have changed the assessment of the British economy in recent years. We now know that, contrary to claims that were made at the time, there was no...

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Autumn Statement (3 December 2014)

George Osborne: ...also falls and moves into surplus at the same pace over the next five years, as forecast at the Budget. We continue to meet the debt mandate a year late and the fiscal mandate two years early. Again, because of the statistical revisions and the reclassification of Network Rail—given that Labour tried to put it off balance sheet—the OBR has given us a like-for-like comparison on...

Written Answers — Ministry of Justice: Prisoners (3 December 2014)

Andrew Selous: Crime is falling and under this Government more offenders are going to prison and for longer. In 2012 the law was changed to introduce an automatic life sentence for a second very serious sexual or violent offence and there are several measures to strengthen sentencing in this area in the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill, currently going through Parliament. These include ending automatic...

Written Answers — Ministry of Justice: Sentencing (3 December 2014)

Michael Penning: Whilst crime is falling, since 2010 offenders are more likely to go to prison, and for longer. In 2013, of all offenders sentenced for indictable offences, 27% were sentenced to immediate custody, 23% to community sentences, 18% to a fine, and 12% to a Suspended Sentence Order. In 2013, for the first time in the period between 2003 and 2013, immediate custody was the most common disposal...

Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill: Second Reading (2 December 2014)

Lord Leigh of Hurley: ...to list all their rejected applications where the applicant consents. That then means, first, that banks will take much more care before rejecting an application, as not only will it have a significant impact on their published success statistics, but by rejecting it they are opening the door to their own competitors. Secondly, the SMEs will now be exposed to many potential sources of...

Modern Slavery Bill — Committee (1st Day) (Continued) (1 December 2014)

Lord McColl of Dulwich: ...the Council of Europe convention and the EU directive on trafficking call for states to adopt measures to address the demand for exploitation that fosters trafficking. National referral mechanism statistics clearly demonstrate that since 2009 paid sex has consistently been the most prevalent form of exploitation experienced by victims of trafficking in the United Kingdom. It accounts for...

Modern Slavery Bill — Committee (1st Day) (1 December 2014)

Lord Bates: ...trafficking, which was published a few weeks ago. We are working our way through it, but one of the things that the review is considering is where victims’ interests lie and how we can strengthen their position. I am struck by a few statistics that lie at the heart of this matter. The Modern Slavery Strategy sets out that in 2013 there were 226 convictions. However, the scale of the...

Written Answers — Home Office: Offences against Children (1 December 2014)

Lynne Featherstone: Holding answer received on 24 November 2014 The police recorded crime data that the Home Office receives from the police forces of England and Wales relate only to how many crimes are recorded and not how many reports are received or how many people were victims. It is only possible to centrally provide figures for certain sexual offences that identify the age of the victim in...

Written Answers — Home Office: Offences against Children (1 December 2014)

Lynne Featherstone: Holding answer received on 24 November 2014 The police recorded crime data that the Home Office receives from the police forces of England and Wales relate only to how many crimes are recorded and not how many reports are received. It is only possible to centrally provide figures for certain sexual offences that identify the age of the victim in statute, namely:  Rape of a...

Written Answers — Home Office: Offences against Children (1 December 2014)

Lynne Featherstone: Holding answer received on 28 November 2014 The police recorded crime data that the Home Office receives from the police forces of England and Wales relate only to how many crimes are recorded and not how many reports are received or how many people were victims. It is only possible to centrally provide figures for certain sexual offences that identify the age of the victim in...

Written Answers — Home Office: Homophobia (1 December 2014)

Lynne Featherstone: All forms of hate crime are deplorable and it is important that victims are protected and have the confidence to come forward. In May, we published our refreshed cross-Government hate crime action plan—Challenge it, Report it, Stop it, setting out the progress we have made and further steps we will take to address the issue. The government is driving forward work to tackle homophobic...

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