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Results 1-20 of 23,929 for immigration

Written Answers — Ministry of Defence: Libya (18 December 2014)

Mark Francois: ...candidates were then subject to additional UK vetting in Libya, to ensure that those selected met Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Ministry of Defence and Home Office requirements on security, immigration, medical, physical, literacy and numeracy criteria; in addition, the selected cohort comprised a suitable geographic representation of Libya. Home Office visa processes included checks...

Written Answers — Home Office: Christmas Cards (18 December 2014)

Karen Bradley: The Home Secretary and other Home Office Ministers send electronic Christmas cards to a range of individuals and organisations involved in cutting crime, reducing immigration and preventing terrorism. I wish the Hon. Member a Merry Christmas too.

Opposition Day — [11th Allotted Day]: Housing Benefit (Abolition of Social Sector Size Criteria) (17 December 2014)

Mark Harper: ...have had their benefits capped, while 12,000 have moved into work or are no longer on housing benefit. It is small wonder that Labour does not want to talk about the jobs figures, the economy or immigration. As we learnt from the recently released document, Labour’s approach is, “If you don’t want to talk about something, change the subject.” I do not blame them: it...

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Engagements (17 December 2014) See 2 other results from this debate

David Cameron: .... They cannot talk about the deficit, because it has fallen. They cannot talk about growth, because it is rising. They cannot talk about jobs, because we are increasing them. They cannot talk about immigration, because they have been told not to. They cannot talk about their leader, because he is a complete waste of space. No wonder for Labour MPs this year it is a silent night.

Written Answers — Home Office: Immigration Controls (17 December 2014)

Paul Blomfield: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraph 4 of page 1 of her Department's publication, Changes to Family Migration Rules Impact Assessment, published on 12 June 2012, if she will ensure that the Government's review of family migration rules planned for April 2015 takes into account the recommendations of the APPG on Migration's inquiry into family...

Written Answers — Home Office: Asylum and Immigration Tribunal (17 December 2014)

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the (a) average and (b) target time taken between the completion of an immigration tribunal and the implementation of that tribunal's decision is.

Written Answers — Home Office: Film (17 December 2014) See 1 other result from this answer

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many requests from broadcasters her Department has received to film (a) prisons and (b) immigration removal centres in the last five years; and how many such requests have been granted.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Entry Clearances: Married People (17 December 2014)

Lord Bates: It is government policy not to allow the formation of polygamous households in the UK. Section 2 of the Immigration Act 1988 and the Immigration Rules prevent a UK resident from sponsoring a second or subsequent non-European Economic Area national spouse to come or remain here, if another person has already been admitted as his or her spouse and the marriage has not been dissolved.

Written Ministerial Statements — House of Lords: Intercept Evidence (17 December 2014)

Lord Bates: My hon Friend the Minister of State for Security and Immigration (James Brokenshire) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement: The interception of communications plays a vital role in preventing terrorist attacks and tackling serious and organised crime. Interception is used in some form in the majority of MI5’s top priority counter-terrorism investigations. It plays a...

Bills Presented: Clause 36 — Privacy and Civil Liberties Board (16 December 2014)

David Davis: ...crime syndicates in America are better advised than the likes of al-Qaeda by lawyers and technical people. The Americans have something called a CIPA process—CIPA stands for “Confidential Information Protection Act”. There is a CIPA court, which is a bit like the Special Immigration Appeals Commission. It involves security-cleared prosecution and defence counsel and a...

Bills Presented: Clause 21 — General duty on specified authorities (16 December 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

Pete Wishart: ...do so. We just take a different view of such things: we have a different type of community and a different approach to the issues that have emerged during the past few years. The Minister for Security and Immigration is now deep in conversation, but I hope he will allow us to pursue our agenda on such matters. Scottish public bodies that were initially listed in schedules 3 and 4 are no...

Public Bill Committee: Infrastructure Bill [Lords]: Clause 3 - Road Investment Strategy (16 December 2014)

Richard Burden: ...right number of skilled people. In its words, the target “limits the availability of skilled employees required to deliver key projects.” It needs to be proposed with a smart system of different levels and targets for different types of immigration, as the shadow Home Secretary has been calling for, rather than the current target that is too blunt, unworkable, and delivers...

Oral Answers to Questions — Justice: Immigration and Asylum (16 December 2014)

Immigration and Asylum

Oral Answers to Questions — Justice: Judicial Review (16 December 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

Andrew Bridgen: Recent figures show that the number of judicial review applications lodged between 2000 and 2013 increased threefold, and many of them related to immigration and asylum cases. Does the Secretary of State agree that the Government have a responsibility to ensure that the judicial review process is used appropriately?

Written Answers — House of Lords: Asylum: Finance (16 December 2014)

Lord Bates: Asylum seekers are supported by the Home Office if they are destitute under Section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999. This support continues until all appeal rights have been exhausted and the asylum seeker is either granted leave or the asylum claim refused. Failed asylum seekers are not usually entitled to support, but where there is a legal or practical obstacle that prevents them...

Written Answers — House of Lords: Entry Clearances: Israel (16 December 2014)

Lord Bates: The UK sets its visa regimes in light of immigration, crime and security risks, amongst other factors, and keeps these regimes under regular review. These risks and other factors vary between countries who set visa regimes, so it is quite natural that the United States and the UK will have different visa requirements for the same set of foreign nationals. The UK has no ‘visa waiver...

Written Answers — House of Lords: Entry Clearances: Israel (16 December 2014)

Lord Bates: ...can, in individual cases, decide whether a person should be excluded from the UK regardless of whether they require a visa to come to the UK or not. The UK sets its visa regimes in light of immigration, crime and security risks, amongst other factors, and keeps these regimes under regular review. The UK has no ‘visa waiver agreement’ with Israel.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Immigration Controls (16 December 2014)

Lord Morrow: To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bates on 20 November (HL2506), in respect of persons with a conviction for sex offences, violent conduct, and manslaughter or murder who have been permitted entry to the United Kingdom, (1) what public protection arrangements are instigated and whether they are a mandatory condition of entry, and (2) in respect of...

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