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Results 1-20 of 4,070 for gcse

Women: Economic Empowerment — Motion to Take Note (5 March 2015) See 2 other results from this debate

Baroness Perry of Southwark: ...pupils taking maths and science subjects at A-level: an increase of 13% in maths, 21% in further maths, 16% in physics, 17% in biology, 6% in chemistry. More girls than ever are taking A-level chemistry and physics, while at GCSE the number of girls taking chemistry, for example, has almost doubled since 2009 from over 37,000 to over 63,000. That is indeed good news. We have much reason to...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Committee Business: STEM in Schools (2 March 2015) See 2 other results from this debate

Patsy McGlone: — as an option for young people at GCSE level and that where schools are too small, they should offer effectively —

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: STEM Subjects (2 March 2015) See 1 other result from this debate

Chi Onwurah: Recent research found that more than a third of schools in Newcastle do not offer triple science at GCSE. Newcastle has a thriving digital and information and communications technology hub, and a history of fantastic scientific achievement such as the recent mitochondrial breakthrough. What is the Minister doing to make sure that every pupil in Newcastle can access triple science if they have...

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: Modern Languages (2 March 2015) See 2 other results from this debate

Nick Gibb: The new curriculum requires all maintained primary schools to teach a foreign language to pupils from the age of seven. The number of entries for a modern language GCSE has increased by 20% since 2010 due to the introduction of the English baccalaureate performance measure, a major step towards remedying the enormous damage to foreign language teaching in schools caused by the previous Labour...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Committee Business: STEM in Schools (2 March 2015)

Sean Rogers: ...meet children of 11 who said that they hated maths, but, in most cases, when you answered the "Why?", they gained the confidence. They never got to the stage of loving maths, but they got their GCSE. The same is true for other STEM subjects and can be even more profound. You will not turn a 14-year-old on to physics if the only physics experience is their physics text book. I remember...

Written Answers — Department for Education: Science: Education (2 March 2015)

Lord Nash: ...but did not enter any pupils for these qualifications in 2013/14. It also excludes those schools with no pupils entered for triple science GCSEs but where pupils have been entered for all three of GCSE science, GCSE further science and GCSE further additional science, which together cover the same content as GCSE triple science. The Government is providing 2.6 million in...

Written Answers — Department for Education: Classics: Education (2 March 2015)

Lord Nash: Our reform programme for GCSE and A levels is intended to ensure they are demanding and more rigorous. We have taken account of a wide range of concerns in ensuring that the final content for ancient language GCSEs provides a suitable preparation for further study. The published content for A and AS levels has been designed to allow the development of new stand-alone AS qualifications,...

Oral Answers to Questions — Culture, Media and Sport: Children and the Arts (26 February 2015) See 1 other result from this debate

Fiona Mactaggart: ...creative arts, except for film, declined every year that the hon. Gentleman has been responsible for this field? Why has the number of children studying art, drama and dance—creative subjects—at GCSE fallen so radically while he has been in charge?

[Hywel Williams in the Chair] — Careers Advice (14 to 19-Year-Olds) (25 February 2015) See 1 other result from this debate

Meg Hillier: ...(Mr Wright) about ensuring that teenagers make the right choice early on. One of the things that My Big Career has discovered is that many young people are being encouraged, quite rightly and effectively, to get a good GCSE in maths, but for many a C grade was just not enough for the course they wanted to take at university. They needed a B grade, and even many heads of maths did not...

Written Ministerial Statements — Department for Education: Publication of reformed GCSE and A level content (12 February 2015)

Nick Gibb: ...A levels will better prepare students for undergraduate study. The government has already published subject content for a number of GCSEs and A levels to be reformed. Content for reformed GCSE subjects can be found here and content for AS/A level subjects here. Today, I am publishing revised content for the remaining GCSEs and A levels that will be taught in schools from September...

Opposition Day — [17th Allotted Day]: Advice on likely impact of onshore petroleum on the carbon budget (11 February 2015)

Andrew Percy: I will not, because other Members are still to speak. There is clearly the potential for fracking. I do not pretend to be a scientist—I stopped studying science when I finished my double-award GCSE at the age of 16—so I will not get into the arguments, but clearly there is the potential for an industry that a large number of my constituents would support, subject to those...

Written Answers — Department for Education: GCSE: Blackpool (10 February 2015)

Gordon Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students in schools under the control of Blackpool Education Authority in Blackpool South constituency received five GCSEs Grade A* to C including mathematics and English in the (a) 2014-15 and (b) 2009-10 academic year; and what those numbers represent as a proportion of the total number.

Written Answers — Department for Education: GCSE: Pendle (10 February 2015)

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils took GCSEs in (a) dance, (b) art and crafts, (c) I.T. (d) art and design, (e) drama, (f) media, film and television and (g) music in Pendle in each of the last five years.

Written Answers — Department for Education: Free School Meals: Blackpool (10 February 2015)

David Laws: Figures for GCSE attainment for the academic year 2014/15 are not yet available. Figures for the 2013/14 academic year by pupil characteristics were published on GOV.UK[1] in January 2015. A time series of local authority attainment for pupils by free school meal eligibility at local authority level is included in the publication; constituency level information by pupil characteristics is not...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Executive Committee Business: Supply Resolution for the 2014-15 Spring Supplementary Estimates (9 February 2015)

Sean Rogers: ...strategic in our planning. We need to be strategic in terms of the educational future of our children. As I said, we are close to a new financial year, but when your child in school makes a choice to do a GCSE or A-level subject, that is a two-year commitment. You could have situations where students made that decision last September but the schools do not know whether they can afford...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Oral Answers to Questions — Education: School Pupils: Skills (9 February 2015)

John O'Dowd: ...a fundamental review of GCSEs and A levels in 2012. That work is in train, and, consequently, new and more challenging A levels and GCSEs will be put in place, including a computer science GCSE.

Northern Ireland Assembly: Oral Answers to Questions — Education: GCSE: New Subjects (9 February 2015)

GCSE: New Subjects

Northern Ireland Assembly: Executive Committee Business: Supply Resolution for the 2014-15 Spring Supplementary Estimates; Supply Resolution for the 2015-16 Vote on Account; and Supply Resolution for the 2015-16 Main Estimate (9 February 2015)

Michelle McIlveen: ...in the Stormont House Agreement, will allow some breathing space for schools and will result in a period during which principals can plan sensibly and arrange changes in resources and staffing in line with school GCSE and A-level cycles. A key point to consider in all of this is that the financial year does not align with the academic year, causing uncertainty when budgets fluctuate. The...

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