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Music Education — Question for Short Debate (28 October 2014) See 2 other results from this debate

Baroness Jolly: ...The noble Lord, Lord Aberdare, asked what the Government are doing to support the sharing of good practice; I think that I have covered that reasonably well. My noble friend Lady Walmsley asked about the EBacc; it is one of those chestnuts that keep coming around. Music GCSE continues to be the headline measure of school performance—the five As to Cs including English and maths...

Opposition Day — [8th allotted day]: Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Welfare Reform (Disabled People) (28 October 2014)

Esther McVey: .... Access to Work is helping more people—5,000 more than in 2011-12. An extra 15 million has been put into that programme. Attainment levels for pupils with special educational needs have increased since 2010-11 at both GCSE and A-level. The number of disabled students gaining their first degree has increased from nearly 32,000 to nearly 40,000 now. We have also reduced the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: Workplace Skills (27 October 2014)

Nicholas Boles: .... We have also raised the quality of apprenticeships and traineeships, and enabled more students to take part in work experience. Students who do not hold at least a grade C in maths and English GCSE at age 16 are now also required to continue to study those subjects.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: Academies (27 October 2014)

Nick Gibb: ...local school to be a good school, and that is what the academies programme is delivering. Sponsored schools that have been open for four years are showing a 5.7 percentage point improvement in their GCSE results compared with their predecessor schools, so it is a programme that is working. I am afraid that in the past too many schools were left languishing under local authority control.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: Topical Questions (27 October 2014) See 3 other results from this debate

Nicky Morgan: As this is the first topical questions session since the summer results, let me congratulate all students who achieved GCSE and A-level results this summer, as well as their hard-working teachers and their families who supported them. I would particularly like to pay tribute to those achieving phonics results—we saw 102,000 more six-year-olds achieving the reading standards this...

Written Answers — Department for Education: Igcse (24 October 2014)

Nicholas Boles: Students on post-16 courses who hold an unregulated IGCSE qualification at Grade C or above will not be required to study maths and English GCSE in 2014/15 or 2015/16. No decision has been made in relation to students who sit the first new GCSEs in summer 2017 and enter post-16 education that September. An announcement will be made before September 2015 when the new GCSEs in maths and English...

Written Answers — Department for Education: Special Educational Needs: Hearing Impairment (24 October 2014)

Edward Timpson: The number and proportion of pupils at the end of key stage 4 with a hearing impairment who achieved 5 or more GCSE A* to C grades (or equivalent) in a) England, b) the South West and c) Plymouth in 2013 can be found in the table below. Pupils with a hearing impairment Number of eligible pupils1 Number of pupils achieving 5 or more A*-C GCSE grades (or equivalent) Percentage of...

Young People: Alternatives to University — Motion to Take Note (23 October 2014) See 2 other results from this debate

Baroness Williams of Trafford: ...the service sector. The national colleges and UTCs are responding to sectoral demand for the hard, STEM subjects. He also talked about the change in qualifications being confusing. The change is simple to understand: to give them a chance in life, students need to have maths and English GCSE by the age of 19. It is also simple to understand that young people can choose between doing a...

[Sir Alan Meale in the Chair] — Communicating Climate Science (23 October 2014)

Amber Rudd: ...care about this and how much you will hold us to account, so that we continue to make the right decisions for your country and the world.” The hon. Lady made an interesting point about education. I am aware that climate change is part of a GCSE geography syllabus, but I do not know whether it goes further than that, and I would like to come back to her on that. To finish, many of...

Written Answers — House of Lords: Education (23 October 2014) See 1 other result from this answer

Lord Quirk: ...sufficient attention is being paid to enhancing the skills of students over the age of 16 in English and maths for those who have (1) have, and (2) have not, achieved a C grade in either subject at GCSE.

Written Answers — House of Lords: School Leaving (22 October 2014)

Lord Nash: ...-19 curriculum to ensure that all students had clear education and employment goals and that the subjects they studied, and other activity, contributed towards these. Students who had not already achieved a GCSE in maths and English were also required to continue to study these subjects. Ofsted’s report reveals that most schools and colleges had made changes, particularly in relation...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Adjournment: Heart Surgery for Children:  Upper Bann (14 October 2014)

Jim Wells: ...just about enough procedures for a safe and sustainable service. My difficulty, which I mentioned to Mr O'Dowd, is that I have had four separate reports by four separate bodies telling me that this is not safe. What do I do with my GCSE biology? Do I say that I know better, or do I listen to world authorities from places like Harvard and to the Chief Medical Officer, who tell...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Private Members' Business: Western Education and Library Board:  Development Proposals (22 September 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

Arlene Foster: ..., as have the pupils, the staff and, indeed, the wider public, as shown by the fact that I presented a petition here some time ago with over 7,000 names. Despite that, both schools continued this year to provide outstanding success at GCSE and A level. Indeed, in the Collegiate, 85% of A-level entries were A* to C, and almost one third of the girls had at least an A* or two As in...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Private Members' Business: Western Education and Library Board:  Development Proposals (22 September 2014) See 1 other result from this debate

Danny Kinahan: ...rather than trying to find a solution. As many here will know, I spend my life in the Chamber trying to promote consensus and ways forward. All of us, of course, agree with commending both schools for their excellent GCSE and A-level results and that we should pour praise on the hard-working teachers and staff in all the schools, just as they should praise pupils who achieve the...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Oral Answers to Questions: GCSE/ A-level Results (16 September 2014)

GCSE/ A-level Results

Improving School Leadership (10 September 2014)

David Laws: ...by a number of the schools in my hon. Friend’s constituency, and I join him in congratulating the schools whose success he celebrated. He mentioned Gable Hall school, which secured a good set of GCSE results this year. A signal of its success is the fact that it does not see that as an end destination, but as something to build on; it is fantastic that it still wants to aim higher....

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