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Results 1-20 of 4,098 for gcse

Outlawries Bill: Debate on the Address — [1st day] (27 May 2015)

Graham Allen: ...Committees. That is the role of Parliament, and my worry is that the Government may seek to ride roughshod over us. That is not a partisan point. If I make any point today, I want to make the simple one—I make it to GCSE students, let alone Members of Parliament—that Government and Parliament are two separate and distinct entities. We tend to conflate them, which makes life a...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Oral Answers to Questions — Education: GCSE Scoring System (12 May 2015)

GCSE Scoring System

Northern Ireland Assembly: Oral Answers to Questions — Office of the First Minister and deputy First Minister: Educational Standards (11 May 2015)

Martin McGuinness: ...the programme stated that it had been successfully implemented for literacy and/or numeracy support. In the post-primary sector, 68% of schools stated that it had been successfully implemented for GCSE English, and 76% for GCSE maths. A report by the western region's education authority on the first year's implementation of the programme has been finalised and will be published later this...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Private Members' Business: Fuel Laundering (20 April 2015) See 1 other result from this debate

Jonathan Bell: ...;18 million, we could employ somewhere in the region of an additional 817 new teachers. I am seeing what somewhere in the region of a quarter of that could do to improve literacy and numeracy in our primary sector and the GCSE sector. Can you imagine what we could do with 817 new teachers? These are the proceeds of just one plant over the period of one year. The people responsible for...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Ministerial Statement: North/South Ministerial Council: Education (14 April 2015)

Michelle McIlveen: ...for GCE A levels. Will the Minister tell the House whether he has made any progress in persuading the Irish Universities Association to change its mind and recognise our applied Northern Ireland GCSE A levels to ensure their portability? In addition, will he provide further detail on the cost associated with the three-year collaborative programme of work and confirm that key services...

Lesser-Taught Languages (24 March 2015) See 7 other results from this debate

Nick Gibb: ...state. The removal of languages from the key stage 4 national curriculum in 2004 by the previous Labour Government led to a 36 percentage point decline in the number of pupils studying a modern foreign language at GCSE. In 2000, 79% of pupils studied a foreign language at GCSE. By 2010, that had fallen to 43%. This Government have taken decisive action to address that decline. We agreed...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Private Members' Business: Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (24 March 2015) See 1 other result from this debate

Patsy McGlone: ...be said for the importance of careers guidance in schools, especially considering that the age of 16 is the critical point at which women are lost to a potential career. Imbalance in STEM begins post-GCSE, despite the fact that girls are now more likely than boys to achieve A* to C grades in maths, core and additional science, and in each of the three individual sciences. Of girls who...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Oral Answers to Questions — Education: Computer Programming: Primary Schools (24 March 2015)

David McNarry: I thank the Minister for his answer. I am sure that he takes the point in my question. In response to a recent Assembly question, the Minister said that 14,480 year-12 pupils sat GCSE in design and technology, which is a pointer. Is the Minister prepared to introduce an early introduction to programming? I take it from his previous answer that he is unable to give me an example of that...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Oral Answers to Questions — Education: Primary Languages (24 March 2015)

John O'Dowd: ...to provide funding for tutors, some of whom only work several hours a week, to provide modern languages in schools. The evidence that it encourages young people to continue to take languages at GCSE and A level is inconclusive. If we are to do something, let us do it on an evidence base rather than having a simple knee-jerk reaction and saying, "Tell you what. We need money. Close down...

Schools (Opportunity to Study for Qualifications) (24 March 2015) See 1 other result from this debate

Fiona Mactaggart: ...languages, including the languages of the growing markets in south Asia, we will lose important outward-facing opportunities for the British economy. Ofqual goes on to say: “We at Ofqual do not…seek to limit the curriculum. We do expect any GCSE, AS or A level to be of comparable demand”. It is saying that it needs the same number of entrants for each subject, but at the...

Written Answers — Department for Education: Languages: Education (24 March 2015) See 1 other result from this answer

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils studied GCSE Polish in 2013-14.

Written Answers — Department for Education: GCE A-level (24 March 2015)

Nick Gibb: In June 2014 Ofqual consulted on a set of proposals about how GCSE and A level subject availability should be determined from September 2017. The consultation can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachm ent_data/file/377804/2014-06-24-completing-gcse-as-and-a-lev el-reform.pdf Ofqual’s consultation set out the proposed process for reform and...

Written Answers — Department for Education: Mathematics: GCSE (24 March 2015)

Joan Walley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, by what date she plans for schools to be sent sample assessment materials for the new GCSE mathematics examination; and if she will make a statement.

Written Answers — Department for Education: Gcse (24 March 2015)

Lord Taylor of Warwick: To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of the finding by the Open Public Services Network that pupils in some parts of England are not offered certain GCSEs, and the impact that this may have on their job prospects.

Northern Ireland Assembly: Oral Answers to Questions — Office of the First Minister and deputy First Minister: Child Poverty Strategy: Implementation (23 March 2015)

Jonathan Bell: ...enterprises, which we have done in Bright Start and, as I said earlier, one of the key strategies for literacy and numeracy in primary schools. We will not see the results of those measures in GCSE outcomes for many, many years to come, but we are already seeing some initial evidence that children's educational achievement is going up. That is what we need to do to ensure that children...

Written Answers — Department for Education: Sixth Form Education (23 March 2015)

Nicholas Boles: ...academic year 2014/15, we reduced the funding for 18-year-olds in full-time education. This will apply to all elements of the formula, except the extra support for disadvantaged students without a GCSE grade C or above in English or mathematics, and students with a learning difficulty assessment or a statement of special educational needs.

Written Answers — Department for Education: Gifted Children (23 March 2015)

Lord Nash: ...measure, Progress 8, will ensure schools are held to account for the progress made by all pupils, including the most able. In addition, from 2017, the introduction of the new top ‘grade 9’ for GCSE set at a level above the current grade A*, will ensure that the achievements of the very highest performers are recognised.

Affordable Childcare (Select Committee Report) — Motion to Take Note (18 March 2015) See 2 other results from this debate

Baroness Garden of Frognal: ..., especially from age two upwards, has positive benefits on children’s all-round attainment and behaviour, particularly for disadvantaged children. We know, too, that these last all the way through to GCSE and future earnings. Evidence strongly supports this. Recognising that early education matters, we have increased the free early education entitlement for all three and four...

Written Answers — Department for Education: Languages: Education (17 March 2015) See 1 other result from this answer

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of the decision by Oxford Cambridge and RSA not to redevelop GCSE and A Level Turkish on the ability of students to acquire skills in Turkish; and if she will make a statement.

Written Answers — Department for Education: GCE A-level (16 March 2015) See 1 other result from this answer

Paul Uppal: To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to ensure that funding is available to schools to enable pupils to continue at A-level subjects they took at GCSE.

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