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Results 1-20 of 54 for speaker:Lord Macdonald of River Glaven

Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill — Report (2nd Day) (4 February 2015)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: In speaking to my Amendment 14A, I again declare an interest as warden of Wadham College, Oxford. Last week in Committee I put my name to the amendment tabled by the noble Lord, Lord Pannick, the purpose of which was to remove universities entirely from the ambit of the Bill. I did so because of what seemed to me to be the self-evidently paramount importance of free speech in universities,...

Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill: Committee (3rd Day) (28 January 2015)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, I put my name to Amendments 110 and 112, along with the noble Lord, Lord Pannick, and I declare an interest as the warden of Wadham College, Oxford. Under the terms of the Education (No. 2) Act 1986, universities are under a statutory duty to, “take such steps as are reasonably practicable to ensure that freedom of speech within the law is secured for members, students and...

Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill: Committee (3rd Day) (28 January 2015)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: If that is the case, no doubt my noble friend the Minister will make that clear. The greater point is that universities are not places of surveillance in the sense intended in this Bill, and they cannot become so without fracturing what is best about them. As far as I can tell, no concern at all appears to be expressed in the legislation or in the guidance that what is being proposed is a...

Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill — Committee (2nd Day) (26 January 2015)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, I was surprised that at an early stage in his speech the noble Lord, Lord West, suggested—until he revised the figure—that communications data were employed in some 95% of criminal cases. My experience from the years when I was responsible for prosecuting serious crime and terrorism was that the figure was 100%. I cannot remember a serious criminal case, and I certainly...

Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill — Committee (2nd Day) (26 January 2015)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, I think noble Lords on all sides of the Committee have acknowledged that, because of the situation in which we presently find ourselves, powers of this sort are regrettably necessary. However, as noble Lords have said, their legitimacy is critical, and the rigour with which conditions are examined before they are imposed and the nature of that imposition itself are of the utmost...

Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill — Committee (1st Day) (20 January 2015)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, I support what the noble Baroness has said. There cannot be any doubt that the power to exclude British citizens from their own country is a wholly exceptional power of the sort that we have not seen before. In fact, it is warranted by the threat that emanates from the globalisation of terror and the ease with which young men in particular, but some young women as well, can pass in...

Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill — Committee (1st Day) (20 January 2015)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, I agree that we should not give away our freedoms in response to terrorism. However, I am satisfied that, properly crafted, this legislation need not do so. It would be a good idea if part of that crafting were to include a sunset clause, primarily for the reasons set out by the noble Lord, Lord Pannick. It is the practicalities of this measure—how it will work in...

Criminal Justice and Courts Bill: Committee (2nd Day) (21 July 2014)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, amen to that. Like the last several speakers, I had not intended to intervene in the debate—this could go on all night, I suppose—but I want to make two points. First, it was my experience, not only as chief prosecutor but also over very many years of practising criminal law, that sentences of between four and six months are not just pointless, as many speakers have...

Assisted Dying Bill [HL]: Second Reading (18 July 2014)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, if this Bill passes into law it will, I believe, herald a fundamental and irreversible shift in the attitude of the state to the deliberate application of death. If it takes place, I am sure that this shift will in time, and perhaps not long into the future, bring further changes in our approach to death by human hand. Many people will support this present shift and some will...

Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Bill — Second Reading (16 July 2014)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, I am not going to labour the importance of communications data in serious criminal trials. That has been widely acknowledged. However, I cannot think of a single major terrorist trial in recent years in which this material has not been deployed to significant and sometimes determinative effect. As the central purpose of the Bill is simply to preserve a situation in which this...

Immigration Bill — Commons Reasons and Amendments (12 May 2014)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, I also put my name to the amendment at Report. I have listened with great care to what the noble Lord, Lord Pannick, has said. It seems that his remarks, if they are adopted by the Government, indicate that the shift in the Government’s position is substantial. If they are not adopted by the Government, they amount to a demolition of the substance of this shift. I see the...

Immigration Bill — Committee (5th Day) (17 March 2014)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, if Clause 60 operates in accordance with the Government’s intentions, it is bound to increase statelessness in the world. The noble Baroness, Lady Lister, has already reminded the Committee of the words spoken by Hannah Arendt many years ago, that statelessness deprives people of the “right to have rights”. It brings about a bleak, hopeless status, or rather a...

Immigration Bill — Committee (5th Day) (17 March 2014)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: Before the Minister sits down, will he respond directly to the suggestion made by the noble Lord, Lord Dubs, that the purpose of the present policy is to make life in the United Kingdom so unattractive for these vulnerable people that they leave?

Assisted Suicide — Question for Short Debate (5 March 2014)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, I, too, thank the noble Baroness for initiating this debate. It is, as she says, a difficult and sensitive subject. My years as DPP brought home to me, in concrete examples day after day, the power that the law has to protect vulnerable people, but also its great capacity to inspire awe and therefore to deter cruelty and abuse. In the case of assisted suicide, the law must do both....

Justice and Security Bill [HL]: Commons Amendments (26 March 2013)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: My Lords, I speak to Amendment 6B in my name. Everyone accepts that CMPs represent a significant departure from normal rule of law principles. Many people accept that they also contain a strong strand of unfairness, and that this unfairness consists in the exclusion of one of the parties from a critical part of the proceedings, perhaps even that very part of the case in which the defining...

Written Answers — House of Lords: Libya (21 January 2013)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken, or intend to take, to address the failure of Libya to surrender Abdullah Al-Senussi to the International Criminal Court in violation of the Order of that Court on 10 December 2012; and whether they have brought the situation to the attention of the United Nations Security Council, or intend so to do.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Libya (21 January 2013)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have any information indicative that the Government of Libya paid, or promised to pay, a sum of money to the Government of Mauritania in return for the transfer of Abdullah Al-Senussi to Libya on or about 5 September 2012.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Libya (21 January 2013)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any of their servants or agents have taken part in the questioning of Abdullah Al-Senussi during the period of his detention in Mauritania or during his period of detention in Libya, either directly or by providing questions or lines of questioning to be put to him in interview.

Justice and Security Bill [HL] — Report (2nd Day) (Continued) (21 November 2012)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: I am going to be fairly brief. I hope that the noble Lord, Lord Reid, will accept that I have an abiding interest in national security. I was Director of Public Prosecutions and chief prosecutor for some of the period that he was Home Secretary, and during the worst of those years that he has been referring to, between 2003 and 2008. We had the London bombings on 7 July, the attempted...

Justice and Security Bill [HL] — Report (2nd Day) (Continued) (21 November 2012)

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven: I understand that. What I want to do is to return, I am afraid, to the legal context. I will be fairly brief. I want to address three questions in the context of closed material procedures: one is public confidence; one is fairness; and I think the most important one is the delivery of justice, as this has been a large part of the Government's argument. To what extent can closed material...

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